Arts Council of Wales | Help Notes for the Production strand of Arts Grants for Organisations

Help Notes for the Production strand of Arts Grants for Organisations

Contents

Section 1: About Your Organisation

Section 2: Your Project Proposal

Section 3: Project Details

Section 4: Project Location

Section 5: Declaration

Section 6: Attachments

Section 7: Review


Introduction

Welcome to the Help Notes for the Production strand of Arts Grants for Organisations.

The aim of these notes is to help you complete your application form online.

We’ll explain how to start using our online system as well as provide you with a guide to the information you must give us about your project. We’ll also tell you why we’re asking for certain information and how we use the information you give us.

How to use these Help Notes

These Help Notes can be read as a "stand-alone" document or you can follow the hyperlinks to look at specific sections of the Notes as you fill in your application form online. They should be read alongside our Getting Started guide, and our further guidance about the Production strand of Arts Grants for Organisations.

Demand for Funding

A large number of people apply for funding through Arts Grants for Organisations and sadly there are many good applications that we aren’t able to support because there isn’t enough money available. We make our decisions based on the information you provide in your application, as well as our strategic priorities, our knowledge about your organisation and your previous activities. And we use our professional judgement to make the difficult choices between the many projects seeking funding. We’ll always try and fund the applications which present the most persuasive case for support.

We can’t support everything, so when planning your project, you should think about what you’d do if your application is unsuccessful, or you’re offered less money than you applied for.

Alternative and Accessible Formats

Sometimes there are particular reasons why people find it difficult to apply for a grant or access our services. If you experience or anticipate any barriers with our application process, require help to make an application, or accessing our services and information, please contact the Information Team to discuss the type of support we can provide. You can find our contact details here.

Keeping in Touch

The number of opportunities to apply and the amount of money that you can apply for in any one year may change. This will depend on the amount of National Lottery money made available to us for distribution. Any changes will be publicised on our website.

By registering at www.artscouncilofwales.org.uk you’ll receive automatic updates about our Lottery funding, as well as news about consultations and other initiatives. Register now for our Newsletter or subscribe to our News feed. Or follow us on Twitter @Arts_Wales_.

Applying Online

You can access our online application system by visiting our website, www.artscouncilofwales.org.uk and by following the links. Or, you can click here.

Once you’ve clicked the Start an application button you’ll need to complete a simple questionnaire that checks if you’re eligible to apply. If your organisation is eligible you’ll be asked to choose an application form.

If this is your first application you’ll need to create an account. Click on the Cyfrif Newydd / New Account link to register your email address and password. These will be your login details, and you’ll need them every time you use our online application system.

When you’re working on your application online it’s useful to remember:

  • You can fill in your application in one go, or work on it at different times
  • You can fill in the sections of the form in whichever order your prefer, but you will only be able to submit your application when all of the sections are complete
  • If you have your application form open on your computer, but do not work on it for 2 hours, you will automatically be logged out of our online system. Any work that you haven’t saved by then will be lost

FAQ: I started filling in an application form online but now it’s gone. What do I do?

Periodically we need to update our online application forms, and this involves switching them off for a short time. For Large Grants, this happens after each deadline. To make sure that we always receive applications on the most up to date forms, any unfinished applications are removed at this time. To continue making your application you’ll need to start a new form.

You’ll be able to paste information into your new form from the most recent email we sent you containing your saved application.

Getting Started Checklist

Make sure you’ve read our Getting Started document and the Production strand document before you start to fill in your application form.

Have you get everything you need to complete your application form?

  • Your organisation’s contact details and information (unless you’ve applied to us before using our online system)
  • Your written project proposal, including evidence of demand for your project
  • Your project details (including dates, artform breakdowns, activity targets, equalities
  • information, postcodes of all venue or activity locations)
  • Your Project Budget (this must be on the downloaded template)
  • Your Marketing Plan
  • Your letters of support endorsing your project (you must provide at least two letters)
  • Your Provisional Tour schedule (for touring projects only)
  • Your accounts for the last two financial years. If your organisation is less than two years old and doesn’t have accounts, you will need to show evidence of a bank account in your organisation’s name with at least two signatories
  • Your Other Supporting Information (this is optional, but could include examples of creative work, CVs of artists and other creative professionals, case studies, testimonials, endorsements from organisations and individuals who’ll be working with you and other letters of support

Section 1: About Your Organisation

In this section we’re asking you to tell us some basic information about your organisation.

Contact Details

We ask for three sets of contact details:

  • Your organisation’s address (its main administrative office or base)
  • The Chair of your Board or Management Committee (or your equivalent governing body)
  • The person in your organisation authorised to deal with all matters relating to this application (we call this person the Primary Contact)

The Primary Contact is the person we will get in touch with regarding all aspects of your application, and they must have your organisation’s authority to sign and approve documents and answer any queries we may have.

If your Chair and Primary Contact are the same person, we may ask for further verification, for example a copy of your constitution (or other governing document) or a list of your management committee members (or equivalent governing body).

If your application is successful, the grant offer will be sent to the Primary Contact. They will be responsible for sending us the additional information needed to address any specific conditions placed on the grant, as well as any interim reports as the project progresses. They will also be responsible for sending us a Completion Report once the project has ended.

We’ll only ask you to provide these contact details the first time you apply to us online. If you decide to make another application to us, these details will already be filled in on the online application form for you to review and update if you need to.

Your organisation and main areas of activity

We are often asked about the types of organisations we fund and what arts activity they usually deliver. The information you give us here will help us answer these questions. It will also help us when we assess your application. There are three things for you to do:

  • Tell us about your organisation. You can only write 500 words, so think about the key facts which sum up your organisation and your usual arts activity.
  • Select the most appropriate categories from the dropdown lists. If you’re unsure of the Government region where you’re based just use our online postcode lookup tool.
  • Tell us how many paid or voluntary staff you have. This helps us to understand the size of your organisation and the number of people that will be supporting your project. Please round up to the nearest whole number.

Section 2: Your Project Proposal

In this section we’re asking you to tell us in detail about your project. Instead of asking you to answer lots of questions, we’d like you to write a proposal about your project.

The information we need from you must be broken down into the following sections:

  • Describing your project
  • Delivering artistic quality
  • Benefiting the public
  • Planning and managing a successful project
  • Funding a successful project

It’s important that you follow this structure and the guidelines on the information you need to provide. This helps us compare like with like as part of our assessment process.

In each part of your proposal you’ll need to tell us certain key facts about your project. You’ll also need to show us the extent to which your project meets our expectations for each of these sections.

Wherever you can, please provide us with evidence to support your proposal, for example testimonials and examples of your creative work. We’ll tell you more about how to do this, and about the supporting documents you must provide, in section 6.

We’ll tell you below the information you must give us.

Word limit

There is a limit on the number of words you can write for each section of the proposal:

  • The limit is 450 words for Small Grant applications
  • The limit is 750 words for Large Grant applications

As a guide, one side of typed A4 paper is about 500 words.

Tips on Writing Your Project Proposal

  • Write in clear, simple language, avoiding jargon, acronyms and abbreviations
  • Write about facts, not generalities
  • Back up what you say by providing evidence or hyperlinks to external sources
  • Remember that each section has a word limit, so focus on telling us key information

Describing your Project

Tell us about your project, why it is needed and why you want to do it

Tell us the key facts about your project. We’ll ask you for more detailed information later on, but here we want you to summarise what you want to do and what it will achieve, why you want to do it and why it’s important to you.

The starting point of any good project is identifying a need, so we also want to know why you think your project’s needed. We use the term "need" to mean an issue or situation where something could be changed to make things better. We’ll also want to see the evidence of demand for your project too.

FAQ: How can we show you that there’s a demand for our project?

Evidence of demand comes in many different forms and depends on the type of project you want to deliver and the people it’s aimed at. Here are a few examples that can all be used to show demand for a project:

  • The outcomes of a previous research and development phase
  • The outcomes and evaluation findings of a previous project
  • High quality research and evidence produced by other people
  • Letters of support from people you’ve talked to about your project, such as:
    • Venue or gallery directors who’d like to present your work
    • Local authority officers or other key stakeholders for whom your project would help meet a strategic gap in provision
    • Representatives of target groups that you want to engage in your project

In your project proposal you should:

  • Tell us about your project:
    • Who is it for?
    • What arts activity will take place?
    • Where will the activity take place?
    • When will the activity take place?
  • Show us how you know your project is needed:
    • What evidence of demand do you have?
    • Who have you talked to about your project and what did you find out?
    • Are there any existing strategies or initiatives that are relevant to your project? This could be on a national, regional or local level, for example the Welsh Government, local authorities and our own documents such as our strategy for Creativity and the Arts, called Inspire
  • Tell us why you think your project meets the need you have identified

Attachment: Letters of Support

You’ll need to upload at least two letters of support endorsing your project. These must come from independent third parties (who aren’t being paid as part of your project), and not from within your organisation. They are important as they provide validation of your proposed project.

The letter writers will need to demonstrate an understanding of what you’re project is trying to achieve and will need to explain why they are supporting it. If they’re offering financial or in-kind support they should tell us clearly what that is and confirm the value.

For touring and National Touring projects, we’ll expect to see letters of support from your touring partners. These should demonstrate a significant commitment to your project, rather than a general interest. You can read more about our expectations for touring and National Touring projects in our Production strand document.

Submitting these letters of support is mandatory as they form an essential part of the assessment. We won’t be able to accept your application without them.

Click here to find out how to upload your letters of support.

You can also submit other documents, such as letters that support your view that your project is needed, and that endorse your organisation and its previous work. You can read more in section 6.

In this section we’re looking for:

  • A clear and persuasive description of a well-researched project
  • The extent to which you demonstrate the need and demand for your project
  • The extent to which your project meets the need you have identified
  • The extent to which you demonstrate a fit with our strategy for Creativity and the Arts, called Inspire, and with other relevant national, regional or local strategies or initiatives
  • The extent to which your letters of support provide meaningful endorsement of your organisation and your project

Delivering artistic quality

Tell us about your creative idea. What do you want to achieve? How does your project draw on your previous artistic work? How will you ensure you deliver a high quality project?

We’re ambitious for the arts in Wales and want Arts Grants for Organisations to support quality work. We want to invest in projects that represent the best of the arts in Wales.

Defining "quality" can be difficult. It depends on many factors, including the artistic concept, its development and execution, the creative professionals and other arts organisations that you’ll work with, and partnerships with other stakeholders. It can also depend on the resources available to you, although money doesn’t guarantee a quality outcome.

FAQ: How can we show you that we’ll deliver a high quality project?

We know that you cannot guarantee what the outcomes of a project will be. But there are things that we look for that help us make a judgement on the likelihood of you delivering a high quality project. These include:

  • Your track record: previous experience and artistic achievements, and the calibre of the work you usually do
  • The quality and outcomes of any previous projects that we’ve funded
  • Endorsement and support from the sector in which you work
  • Reviews and critical appraisals of your previous work
  • Evidence of thorough planning and clear aims and objectives
  • The quality of the creative professionals and other arts organisations who will work with you on the project
  • The appropriateness and strength of the partnerships in place to support the delivery of your project

This section has three parts. We want to know about the creative idea or vision for your project, and the reasons behind the creative decisions you’ve taken so far.

We also want you to tell us about your usual artistic work. Understanding more about your track record helps us judge whether the project you’d like to do is in keeping with your experience and achievements to date.

Your Creative Idea

In your project proposal you should:

  • Tell us about the creative idea or vision that’s at the heart of your project
  • Tell us why you want to do this project and what you want to achieve
  • Tell us what, or who, is the artistic inspiration for your project
  • Show us how your project will stand out from the crowd. What makes it distinctive, relevant, imaginative and compelling?
  • Tell us how you’ll ensure you deliver a high quality project

Your Creative Approach

In your project proposal you should:

  • Tell us why you’ve chosen a particular title, theme or location, if appropriate to your project, and how it is relevant to today’s audiences and attenders in Wales
  • Tell us what research and development you have completed to develop your project this far
  • Tell us why you’ve chosen particular creative professionals or arts organisations to work with you, and what they’ll contribute to your project
  • If you’re planning to tour an exhibition or production, tell us why you’ve chosen particular venues or galleries, and tell us about your relationship with them
    • Remember, if you’re applying for a National Touring Project you must tour to a minimum of three professionally managed venues or galleries across Wales: one in our North region, one in our South West region, and one in either our South East or South Central region. You can read more in our Production strand guidance
    • If you’re planning to tour an exhibition or production outside of Wales, as part of a tour that takes place mainly in Wales, tell us about the artistic, financial or business rationale for this decision
  • Tell us if your project will strengthen existing creative partnerships, or, if this is a new collaboration, tell us how this has come about
  • Tell us your approach to quality assurance:
    • Are you working with a critical friend or creative mentor? (This could be a creative professional or another arts organisation)
    • Does peer review play a part in your project’s development and delivery?

If you’ve already chosen the creative professionals who’ll be working with you, you should submit their CVs. You’ll need to tell us how they’ve been selected. Any project staff (including creative professionals) being paid more than £5,000 must be recruited by open selection, unless there is a specific and pressing artistic reason to do otherwise.

You can read more about attachments in section 6.

Attachment: Provisional Tour Schedule

For touring and National Touring projects you must submit a provisional tour schedule. This should list the venues and galleries with whom you’ve been in discussion and provide evidence of their commitment to programme your work.

Remember that your programme must remain provisional until you’ve received a formal offer of grant from us. That’s because we cannot fund any costs that you’ve paid or agreed to pay before we’ve made a grant offer.

Submitting a provisional tour schedule is mandatory as it forms an essential part of the assessment. We won’t be able to accept your application without it.

Click here to find out how to upload your provisional tour schedule.

Your Artistic Track Record

In your project proposal you should:

  • Tell us briefly about your recent, relevant artistic work and achievements
  • Show us how this project draws on or complements your previous artistic work
  • Show us how your artistic track record is a platform for this new project
  • Tell us if your project takes you in a new creative direction. If it does, what’s the creative rationale for this?

In this section we’re looking for:

  • A compelling creative idea or vision that’s at the heart of your project and is reflected throughout its planning and delivery
  • The calibre, track record and appropriateness of the creative professionals and other arts organisations that will be working with you
  • The appropriateness of your project to your organisation’s artistic track record and your experiences and achievements to date

Benefiting the Public

Tell us about the impact of your project (the project outcomes). Tell us about the benefits it will bring to the people of Wales. Tell us how it will contribute to the arts in Wales.

Public benefit is a cornerstone of Lottery funding. The arts are one of the "good causes" which receive money from the National Lottery and that money comes from members of the public buying their Lottery tickets. As the Arts Council of Wales we are required to use our funding for projects which benefit artists, audiences, participants and the wider public in Wales. We take that responsibility seriously and we expect you to do that too.

We want to see how your project will have a positive impact on the people of Wales, either as audience members or participants, and what legacy it will leave.

We also want to see how your project will contribute to the arts in Wales. That’s because as the public body responsible for developing the arts in Wales we want to support projects that help develop the arts sector here.

FAQ: I don’t understand what is meant by "contribute to the arts in Wales"?

Each project is unique in the way it makes a contribution to the arts in Wales. Here are some examples to think about:

  • Will your project help develop creative practice or develop a specific artform?
  • Will your project create artistic work or services that will benefit other arts organisations and / creative professionals?
  • Will your project fill a strategic gap in provision?
  • Will your project help raise the quality of artistic work in Wales?
  • Will your project provide employment opportunities for creative professionals?
  • Will your project develop new and innovative partnerships and creative collaborations?
  • Will your project involve opportunities for knowledge transfer, skills development, mentoring or networking opportunities?

It’s in this section that we want you to tell us how your project responds to certain issues that we think are fundamentally important.

Wales is a bilingual nation – legally, socially, culturally, and as individuals and communities – and nothing makes Wales more distinctive than the Welsh Language. We expect people to be able to engage with the arts in the language of their choice, whether as audience, participant or artist. We’ll expect you to reflect this appropriately in your project.

We want the arts in Wales to be more inclusive and engaging. So, we want the organisations that we fund to embed the principles of equality and diversity in all that they do. We also want to extend the reach of our funding into areas of acknowledged deprivation, such as Communities First areas. We’ll expect you to demonstrate how you’ve considered these issues in this section of your proposal.

You can read more about what we expect from you in terms of benefiting the public in Inspire and in the Production strand document, which highlights the particular groups we want to reach.

Benefit to the People of Wales

In your project proposal you should:

  • Tell us about your project’s outcomes
  • Tell us who will benefit from your project, either as audience members or participants, or in other ways:
    • Show us how you’ve identified these groups
    • Tell us why your project is appropriate for your proposed audience members or participants
  • Tell us how you’ll reach and attract people to attend or take part in your project. You must submit a marketing plan and a robust audience development plan which will help you demonstrate this)
    • Tell us how your project will tackle barriers to engagement and reach out as far as possible to audiences and participants
    • Show us how you’ll reach out to audiences and participants in areas of acknowledged deprivation, such as Communities First areas
  • Show us how you’ll make your production as accessible as possible. We’ve specific requirements about accessibility that we expect you to meet. You can find out more in the Production strand document [hyperlink]
  • Tell us how you’ll ensure that audience members and / or participants will have a high quality experience
  • Show us how your project could have a lasting impact on participants and audience members
  • Show us how your project reflects that Wales is a bilingual nation
  • If you’re proposing the production of site-specific or outdoor work, tell us that the location is suitable and accessible

Attachment: Marketing Plan

You’ll need to submit a marketing plan for your project. Developing your marketing plan will help you focus on who you want to reach and how you’re going to reach them.

We need to know how you’re going to reach the people that will take part in or attend your project. You’ll need to demonstrate that you understand your target groups and have carried out some analysis of potential audiences and participants (you may find some of the audience Research data on our website helpful). We’ll also expect you to have considered the best ways to communicate with different types of people, as well as how you will use the media (including social media) to promote your project.

We’ll expect your marketing plan to contain a timetable setting out when different kinds of marketing activity will be carried out. We’ll also review the marketing costs that you include in your project budget to make sure they are appropriate for what you plan to do.

We need to be confident that your marketing plan is practical and realistic. We’ll expect it to be appropriate to the scale of your project, and the level of detail you need to include will reflect its scope and its aims and objectives.

Your marketing plan should be complemented by a robust approach to audience development too.

On our website you’ll find a step-by-step guide to writing a Marketing Plan. It includes a template which you can use for all types of projects and when applying for our funding.

Submitting a marketing plan is mandatory as it forms an essential part of the assessment. We won’t be able to accept your application without it.

Click here to find out how to upload your plan.

Contribution to the Arts in Wales

In your proposal you should:

  • Tell us how your project contributes to the development of the sector in Wales
  • Show us how your project is relevant and important to the artform/s in which you work
  • Tell us how your project will raise standards and / or sustain artistic excellence in the artform/s in which you work

If you intend to buy a project-specific item of capital equipment, you’ll need to tell us how the equipment will be used during and after the project. (You’ll also need to submit three quotations for any single item costing more than £500).

In this section we’re looking for:

  • A clear and detailed description of the proposed outcomes of your project and its impact on your intended beneficiaries
  • The extent to which the project outcomes you aim to deliver are realistic and achievable
  • The extent to which your plans to reach out and attract people to your project are appropriate and achievable
  • The extent to which you’ve considered issues of inclusion, equality and diversity in your project and have credible plans in place to minimise barriers to attendance and participation
  • The extent to which your project will contribute to the development of the arts in Wales

Planning and Managing a Successful Project

Tell us about your approach to your project. Tell us who’ll be responsible for its delivery. Tell us how you’ll keep your project on track, and how you’ll know that it’s been successful

We know that a well-planned project with effective management is more likely to lead to a successful end result. So we want to know that your organisation is well-run, with the capacity and the right skills and experience to deliver your project successfully, alongside your usual work. We also want to know about how you’ve approached planning your project.

We also want you to tell us how you’ll monitor your project’s progress and keep things on track, and how you’ll evaluate your project’s impact on its completion. By taking a structured approach to monitoring your project, you can respond quickly to any issues as they arise and change your project plan accordingly.

Evaluation is a crucial part of any project, and it’s more straightforward if you think about it at the outset. Put simply, evaluation is a structured way of thinking about what has happened.

In difficult financial times when there is greater pressure on the funding available, good evaluation can be a great tool in helping you become more financially viable and resilient, as it demonstrates to other funders and stakeholders the quality and impact of what you can deliver.

Remember that we will ask you to fill in a Completion Report once your project has ended, so all the monitoring and evaluation you carry out during and after the project will make filling this in easier.

Planning your Project

In your proposal you should:

  • Tell us your project’s aims and objectives. How did you agree on these?
  • Show us how your project fits with your organisation’s aims and its current Business Plan:
    • Why is it appropriate for you to deliver this project?
    • How is it additional to your usual work?
  • Show us that you have considered the impact of your project on your organisation’s capacity to deliver its usual activity:
    • Will there be any long-term effects on your organisation as a result of delivering this project?
  • Tell us about your project plan:
    • How have you developed the project plan, and why do you think it’s achievable?
    • What are the key stages of activity?
    • How have you ensured that the timescales are realistic?
  • Tell us if you’re working in partnership with any other organisations or creative professionals:
    • Tell us about their role and how the partnership came about
    • Tell us what practical or financial support they will provide
    • Tell us how you will ensure that there is clarity of roles and responsibilities between all the partners involved in the project
  • Show us how you’ve sought to minimise the environmental impact of your project

You may wish to submit a project plan in your own format as one of your supporting document. Click here for further information on attachments.

Managing your project

In your proposal you should:

  • Show us that you have the skills, experience and the capacity to successfully deliver your project:
    • Tell us who will be responsible for running the project on a daily basis
    • Tell us what support will be provided by other members of staff and by members of your Board of Management (or equivalent governing body)
    • Tell us if you have any experience of delivering similar projects. What did you learn from these that you can apply to this project?
    • Tell us if you’re employing new staff to deliver the project. How will they be selected? Any project staff, including creative professionals, being paid more than £5,000 must be recruited by open selection unless there is a specific and pressing artistic reason to do otherwise. Please tell us if you believe this is the case.
  • Show us how you will identify, monitor and manage any risks associated with your project:
    • Tell us who is responsible for managing risk during the life of your project

Attachment: Annual Accounts

You must submit copies of your annual accounts for the last two financial years, unless you’re a local authority or university. If your organisation is less than two years old and doesn’t have accounts, you will need to show evidence of a bank account in your organisation’s name with at least two signatories.

This helps us check that you are eligible to apply (for more information, see our Getting Started document). It also shows us that you are financially well run and viable and well placed to take on a new project.

Submitting this information is mandatory as it forms an essential part of the assessment. We won’t be able to accept your application without it.

Click here to find out how to upload your accounts, or what do if you’re a local authority or university.

Monitoring and Evaluating your Project

In your proposal you should:

  • Tell us how you’ll monitor progress against your project’s aims and objectives:
    • How will you keep the project on-track and act upon feedback?
  • Tell us what evidence you’ll collect during the life of the project
  • Show us how you’ll evaluate the impact of your project:
    • Tell us how you’ll know if your project’s been successful
    • Tell us what feedback you’ll gather from audience members, participants and other beneficiaries
    • Tell us who’ll carry out the evaluation. If you’ve chosen to work with somebody from outside your organisation on the evaluation tell us why

In this section we’re looking for:

  • The extent to which you’ve shown us that your organisation is well-managed, financially viable and capable of taking on a project that is over and above what you usually do
  • The extent to which you’ve demonstrated that your project is additional, well-planned and achievable
  • The extent to which you’ve demonstrated how you’ve consulted with your intended beneficiaries
  • The extent to which you’ve shown us that you have the skills and experience in place to deliver and manage the project successfully
  • The extent to which you’ve considered how you will monitor your project effectively while it is running and how you’ll evaluate its impact afterwards

Funding a Successful Project

Tell us about the project budget and the other funding you need to raise to be able to deliver your project

This section goes hand-in-hand with your project budget. Here we want you to tell us about your approach to funding your project.

We’ll want to see that you’ve taken an enterprising approach to funding your project and have maximised the financial contributions from your own funds and from other funding partners.

We’re all operating in difficult financial times, so we urge the organisations we fund to develop more resilient and robust business models that can survive with a reduced dependency on public funds. We’ll expect you to demonstrate a decreasing reliance on our funding and to show that your organisation is financially viable without our funding. This shows us that our funding is only supporting additional activity and not core costs.

We’ll also want to see that your project represents good value for money, with the amount you are requesting being appropriate to the scale and type of project you’re planning.

Attachment: Project Budget

You must submit a project budget with your application form. This must be on our project budget template, which you can download from the application form.

Submitting a project budget is mandatory as it forms an essential part of the assessment. We won’t be able to accept your application without it.

We’ll give you further advice on how to complete your project budget template, here.

In your proposal you should:

  • Tell us about any assumptions you’ve made in formulating your project budget:
    • Show us the evidence you have to back up these assumptions
  • Tell us about the partnership funding you need for your project:
    • Show us where it will come from
    • Tell us if it’s in place
    • If it’s not secured, tell us about your previous and current approach to successful fundraising and show us it will be raised in time
    • If it’s secured, tell us which organisations have confirmed their contribution, and how much they’ve offered towards your project
    • Tell us if you’re planning to raise money from ticket sales or other earnings. Show us these amounts are realistic and achievable
    • Tell us if you’ve included in-kind support as part of your income projections. Show us that this has been confirmed and its value has been verified in writing
  • If you’re planning to continue your project beyond the period covered by our funding, or repeat it in the future, tell us how you intend to pay for this. (You must most not assume that you will receive further funding from us).

In this section we’re looking for:

  • A project budget that balances, is based on realistic assumptions and provides the level of detail we ask for
  • The amount you are requesting from us to be appropriate to the scale and type of project you want to deliver, and that it represents good value for money
  • The extent to which you demonstrate an enterprising approach to, and a successful track record in fundraising or income generation, and how likely it is that you will raise all of the required partnership funding for your project, if you have not already done so
  • The extent to which you demonstrate a decreasing reliance on our funding and show that our funding is not being used to support any of your core costs

How to Fill in Your Project Budget

Remember that your project budget must be on our Project Budget Template, which you can download from the application form. You’ll be able to upload your budget in section 6 of the application form.

Your project budget is a key part of your application. Applicants often ask our advice about completing the project budget template. Here are our answers to some frequently asked questions:

What information makes up a project budget?

Your project budget must include the income for your project (this means all the money that you need to pay for your project), and the expenditure for your project (this means all the items you will be paying for as part of your project). Your budget has to balance, which means your income needs to be the same as your expenditure.

The expenditure section of your project budget should be for the total eligible cost of your project. You’re not able to change your project budget once you’ve submitted it with your application form. So it’s important at this stage that you think about all the different project costs you’ll be paying for.

There are some costs that we’re not able to support, (we call these ineligible costs), so you must also make sure that these aren’t included in your project budget.

What sort of project costs can you support?

We call the project costs that we can support eligible costs. The eligible costs that you’ll include in your project budget will depend on the scale and type of project you’re planning. Here are some examples:

  • Fees for freelance artists and other creative professionals and project staff
  • Training costs
  • Production costs including materials and touring costs,technical support
  • Public engagement costs such as educational outreach work, audience development work, marketing costs, translation costs, interpretative material
  • Costs for making your project more inclusive and accessible such as signed performances
  • Evaluation costs

We know that projects need to be well managed, so we’ll consider up to 20% of the total eligible project cost for administration and overheads relating directly to the delivery of the project and that are additional. We won’t consider more than 20% as we want to see as much money as possible going towards artistic activity.

How do we work out how much to pay the artists and other creative professionals who are working with us on our project?

We are committed to ensuring proper and fair payment to all creative professionals in recognition of their professional status, skills and experience. As a minimum, you need to ensure that industry standard rates of pay are used. You can find out more here.

Can I include the cost of buying equipment in our project budget?

Up to £2,000 of your grant amount can be used as a contribution to a project-specific capital element, such as the purchase of a piece of equipment. You’ll need to tell us in your project proposal how you’ll use this equipment during and after your project.

Will you contribute towards the cost of websites?

We’ll consider funding up to £1,000 towards the costs of developing and hosting a website, if it will be used primarily to market and promote your project. If developing a website is central to the creative vision of your project and you’ll be using it as a platform for your artistic practice, then we’ll consider funding more than £1,000 towards the reasonable costs of developing and hosting a website.

You’ll need to show us how you’ll use the website both during and after your project.

We want to tour outside of Wales. Will you contribute to these costs?

We’ll consider funding up to 15% of the total eligible cost of a project to enable touring outside of Wales, as part of a tour that takes place mainly in Wales. You’ll need to present a clear artistic, financial or business rationale for this.

What project costs are you not able to support?

We call these ineligible costs. We can’t give you a definitive list as we’ll consider your project budget in detail when we assess your application. But here are some examples:

  • Accountancy and audit fees
  • Your organisation’s general running costs and ongoing overheads, for example rent, staff salaries and utilities
  • Costs for using your own spaces, facilities or equipment
  • Fees you’re charged for advice on and help with completing your application
  • Food, refreshments or hospitality costs
  • Prizes
  • Fundraising activities
  • Launch costs
  • Promotional t-shirts and other merchandise
  • Gifts such as flowers
  • Fireworks and other pyrotechnics

We also cannot consider retrospective costs. By this we mean activity that has already taken place, or any costs that you have paid or agreed to pay (by signing a contract or placing an order for example), before we have made a decision on your application and you have accepted our offer of grant.

How much can we apply for?

The maximum amount you can apply for is £30,000 or 75% of the total eligible project cost. In exceptional circumstances you can apply for up to £100,000 for a National Touring project only. You can read more about these exceptions in our Getting Started document.

What do you mean by Partnership Funding?

Our funding is offered as a percentage of the total eligible project cost. You’ll need to find the rest that you need from your own funds or other sources, and this is what’s known as partnership funding. (It can also be called match funding).

Partnership funding is a requirement of the National Lottery, but we feel strongly that it also helps demonstrate the strength and potential of your project idea. This shows us that there’s a commitment to your project. It also shows us that other stakeholders agree that your project meets a need, that it will have public benefit, and that they are prepared to invest money in it. It also means they can help share some of the financial risk.

At least 25% of your project’s income will need to come from a non-Arts Council of Wales source. Remember this is a minimum percentage and we’ll expect you to maximise the contributions to your project from your own funds, from earned income and from other funding partners.

We’re also keen to support project that are funded collaboratively, rather than those which rely on us to be the major – or sole – funder. The more partnership funding you can secure, the stronger your project becomes. It also allows us to spread our funding more widely, helping us support more projects.

Here are some examples of sources of partnership funding:

  • Your organisation’s own funds, although these must have come from a non-Lottery and non-Arts Council of Wales source
  • Cash contributions from other partners in the project (such as fees)
  • Earned income (such as tickets or exhibition sales)
  • Grants from other organisations (at least 10% must be from non-Lottery sources)

What is support in-kind?

Support in-kind (sometimes called in-kind contributions), of up to 10% of the total eligible project cost can be included as partnership funding. Here are some examples of support in kind:

  • donated rehearsal and studio space
  • volunteer time
  • loans of equipment

Support in-kind cannot be from your own resources. Suppliers’ discounts are not eligible. You’ll need to provide written evidence of all support in kind that includes its value. These can be uploaded in section 6 of the application form.

Using the Project Budget Template

We use a budget template to help you present your financial information in a clear and structured way. This also helps us compare project budgets from different applications in a consistent way.

The template will guide you through completing your project budget. It has four pages (or tabs):

  • A summary page that checks your budget balances
  • An income page
  • An expenditure page
  • A checklist

The template will automatically calculate subtotals for you, check that your budget balances, and check that you’re applying for an amount within the maximum percentage we’re able to fund. It will also display messages to offer advice, ask questions or to give reminders. We can accept a budget with green or amber messages, but not one with red messages. If you see a red message you’ll need to review your figures before you can upload your budget.

You can fill in the grey boxes in the spreadsheet with text and figures, but the white boxes can’t be changed. Your figures should be rounded to full pounds (£). Some of the boxes will ask you to select from a dropdown menu.

If the template doesn’t give you enough room to tell us about the assumptions you’ve made in arriving at your figures, or you’d like to provide further information about your budget you can upload this as Other information in section 6 of your application form.

Completing your project budget

Page 1: Balance

Please fill in your organisation’s name and whether you’re a Revenue Funded Organisation (RFO). Tell us your project’s title and the amount you’re applying for (in full £). Make sure the amount matches the figure you’ve put in your application form. The other figures will update automatically as you fill in the rest of the budget.

Page 2: Income

Please tell us about all the income that you’ll use to pay for your project, under the headings given. If you need additional space please use the lower section of the page, making sure you select the relevant heading from the dropdown menu.

Arts Council of Wales grant request

  • This figure is already filled in for you

Your own funds

  • List any financial contribution you know you’ll make to the project
  • If you’re a RFO you cannot use any part of your revenue grant as partnership funding for your project

Earned income

  • List any income you expect to earn from your project activity, for example from ticket sales, workshop or training fees or catalogue/programme sales. You should be realistic about the amount you’re likely to earn. You should tell us any assumptions you’ve made in reaching these figures.
An example of the level of detail we need would be five performances each with an audience of 210 at £5 per ticket = £5,250.
  • If VAT is charged on your ticket sales or admission price, you shouldn’t include it in your earned income

Local authority funding

  • List all grants from local authorities. Please give us the name of each local authority, the amount they’re giving and whether it’s been confirmed in writing. If you’re waiting to hear, please tell us when you’re expecting a decision.

Other public funding

  • List all grants from any other public organisations, such as the Welsh Government or European Union. Again please give us the name of each funder, the amount they’re giving and whether it’s been confirmed in writing. If you’re waiting to hear, please tell us when you’re expecting a decision

Support in kind

  • Estimate the cost or value of any items or services given to you by other organisations that you would otherwise have to pay for. These count as income for your project, (to a maximum of 10% of the total eligible project cost), but cannot be from your own resources and they cannot be suppliers’ discounts.
An example of the level of detail we need would be hire of a hall for 6 days at £50 per day = an in kind value of £300.
  • List each provider of in kind support, the value of what they’re giving and whether it's been confirmed in writing. (Letters of support from each provider are a good way of showing this and can be uploaded in section 6 of the application form).

You can read more about support in kind in our project budget related frequently asked questions, above.

Additional income sources

  • Tell us about income from any other source. This might include:
    • sponsorship
    • donations
    • grants from trusts and foundations

Please give us the name of each source, the amount they’re giving, and if possible whether it’s been confirmed in writing. If you’re waiting to hear, please tell us when you’re expecting a decision.

You should submit any relevant letters about your partnership funding with your application form. You can read more about how to upload documents in section 6.

When you’re done, click Finished to go back to the Balance page, where your income total is now showing.

Page 3 – Expenditure

Please tell us about all of the items you’ll be paying for as part of your project, under the headings given.

All of your project costs must be eligible. You can read more about eligible costs in our project budget related frequently asked questions, above.

You must provide a breakdown of any costs that amount to more than 5% of the total eligible project cost. The template will help you identify which costs you need to breakdown.

If you need additional space please use the lower section of the page, making sure you select the relevant heading from the dropdown menu.

A Note about VAT

If you’re registered for VAT, your expenditure figures shouldn’t include VAT that you can claim back (often called recoverable VAT).

If you’re not registered for VAT your costs should include VAT. Any VAT that you expect to incur but can’t claim back (irrecoverable VAT) should be included as a separate category of expenditure and you should explain how you calculated this figure.

Here’s an example of the level of detail we expect you to provide on the expenditure page of your project budget:

Artistic activity costs

3 actors @ £350 per week for 10 weeks, 1 stage manager @ £400 per week for 10 weeks

£14,500

Subsistence for 4 staff @ £50 per day x 20 days

£4,000

Hire of van @ £60 per day x 20 days

£1,200

Hire of rehearsal space at ABC Theatre, 10 sessions @ £150 per session

£1,500

Artistic activity costs

  • List the fees and wages of all artists and other creative professionals who’ll work on your project, for example, actors, musicians, composers, stage managers, choreographers, producers, curators, trainers and workshop leaders. As a minimum you need to ensure that industry standard rates of pay are used. You can get advice about this from organisations like Equity, the Musician’s Union, UK Theatre, and the Independent Theatre Council. For visual artists, a-n, the Artists Information Company has a section on its website called the Knowledge Bank which contains useful information for visual arts practice including guidance on rates of pay.
  • List the costs of the rehearsals, studio time, events and productions, along with any materials you need
  • Include all costs that directly support your artistic activity, for example travel, transport, accommodation and daily subsistence (sometimes called per diems)

Marketing and audience development costs

  • List the marketing and promotional costs that directly support your artistic activity and enable you to reach and attract audiences and participants, for example freelancer marketing, press and PR fees, data analysis, mailing lists, postage, translation, design and print costs, social media and electronic mailing costs

Monitoring and evaluation costs

  • List the costs of gathering evidence before, during and after your project, for example participant surveys or post-event audience questionnaires, testimonials, feedback forms or video responses
  • List the costs of any quality assurance measures you’re putting into place, for example peer reviews or input from a critical friend
  • List the costs of providing evidence of the impact of your project, for example fees for external evaluators

Purchase of equipment

  • Our grant can include up to £2,000 as a contribution to a project-specific capital element such as a piece of equipment that you need to purchase so you can deliver the project.
  • For any single item costing more than £500 you should submit three written quotations from separate suppliers for identical or comparable equipment. The quotation figure you choose to include in your project budget should be the one that represents the best value

Costs of making your activity more accessible

  • We expect you to make your activity accessible to disabled people. There are many things you can do to make your project more accessible that don’t actually cost anything, but you should plan for any necessary access costs and include them here
  • Remember that our requirements for making your project as accessible as possible are set out in the Production strand document. You should re-read this information before you complete your project budget.
  • If your organisation is disability led (by this we mean that more than 51% of your board or management committee and senior staff are disabled people), you can apply for funding towards access costs you’ll incur in delivering your project. These costs will be considered in addition to the artistic project costs and we’ll consider allowing your application to exceed the maximum level. You should contact us to discuss this before submitting your application.

Additional Expenditure

  • List any other project costs that don’t fit under the other headings and provide details

Project running costs (administration and overheads)

  • We can consider project running costs towards administration and overheads, of up to a maximum 20% of the total eligible project cost.
  • We’ll only consider funding project running costs that are not paid for by other funding and that are clearly additional. You must show us that the costs will incurred for a time-limited period and are directly related to your project. We’ll consider contributing towards:
    • Project administration
    • Payments to additional staff
    • Project specific phone, postage and insurance costs
  • If you’re not a Revenue Funded Organisation you can apply for a reasonable contribution to your ongoing running costs to enable you to deliver your project. The figure you use must relate directly to the amount of time spent on the activity you are asking us to fund, so please explain how you’ve worked this out. However you should try to keep this percentage as low as possible, so that more of our funding goes towards artistic activity

Value of support in kind

  • If you filled in the Support in Kind section on the Income page of your project budget, then the template will show the same amount for you here.

You can read more about support in kind in our project budget related frequently asked questions, above.

Contingency

  • A contingency is an amount set aside to cover unexpected costs.
  • You should include up to 5% of your total eligible project cost as a contingency.
  • The template will tell you if your figure is too high

When you’re done, click Finished to go back to the Balance page, where your expenditure total is now showing.

Page 4 – Checklist

You can work through this checklist to make sure that you’ve done everything you need to do before saving and uploading your project budget as part of your application.

Section 3: Project Details

In this section we’re asking you to tell us some facts and figures about your project. It’s an important part of your application as it tells us the targets you’ve set for your project, such as number of attenders or participants and the amount of activity you’ll be delivering. We use this information to judge whether the scale of the project is appropriate and whether you have the skills, experience, resources and capacity to deliver the project successfully.

We also want to know about the artform/s you’ll be working in, and if you’ll be targeting any particular groups of people.

We also use this information to monitor what’s happening across Wales and to report on the impact of our funding.

Project Dates

Please tell us the start and finish dates for your project. The start date of your project should be when you expect to incur costs. We cannot fund any activity that has already taken place.

You need to make sure that your project start date allows enough time for us to make our assessment and confirm our decision, and for you to finalise your planning, preparation, fundraising, marketing and audience development work.

  • For Small Grant applications (£250 - £5,000) we’ll take up to six working weeks to give you a decision. You’ll normally be able to start your project after we’ve received your signed grant acceptance. So you need to allow a minimum of six working weeks between the date you submit your application and the date you want to start your project. We won’t accept your application if your project’s start date is too soon.
  • For Large Grant applications (£5,001 and above) we’ll take up to nine working weeks to give you a decision. You’ll normally be able to start your project after we’ve received your signed grant acceptance and you’ve met any conditions we’ve placed on your grant. So you need to allow a minimum of nine working weeks between the date you submit your application and the date you want to start your project. We won’t accept your application if your project’s start date is too soon.

It’s important you tell us these dates, because if we award you a grant, the payments we make and the reports we request from you will be linked to your project’s start and end dates. If you need to change your project’s start or end date, please contact us as soon as possible to tell us why, so we can agree to these changes and update our records.

Total project cost and amount applied for

You should apply for the lowest amount of money that you need to deliver your project. The maximum percentage of total eligible costs that you can apply for is 75%. You must ensure that the amount you’re requesting from us does not exceed this.

You should also make sure that the figure you tell us here is the same as the amount that you’re applying for on your project budget.

Language

Please use the drop-down menu to tell us the language/s you’ll be using to deliver your project. It’s important you tell us as we often get asked to report on it.

Artform

We often get asked about what percentages of our funding goes on different artforms, so it’s important that you tell us as accurately as possible what proportion of your project activity relates to each artform. There’s a link in the application form to our Artform Definition Guide which will help you complete this section.

Proposed Targets

Please tell us how many exhibitions, productions, workshops, events or training sessions that you’re planning to deliver as part of your project. You’ll also need to tell us the total number of attendances you expect, whether as audience members, exhibition visitors, participants or trainees. It’s important that you include all of the people who may engage with your project, so there’s space to tell us about other beneficiaries too.

If you’re proposing to deliver a range of activities, some of these figures might be an average across the whole project.

Activity Types

We often get asked about what kind of activity we fund. Please tick all of the boxes that apply.

Equalities

Ensuring that the widest possible cross-section of people is able to enjoy and take part in the arts is fundamental to our work. As a public body we have a cultural, moral and legal responsibility to promote equality and inclusion. It’s a responsibility to which we attach great importance.

We want to ensure that we and the organisations that we fund develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of diversity and equality. We want to see more equal access to the arts whether as audiences or participants, so we want our funding to work harder at reaching those people who are affected by inequality. We also want to celebrate the role the arts can play in advancing equality, including fostering good relations between people who are affected by inequality and those who are not.

In spite of the good work undertaken by many artists and arts organisations, we know that some people face barriers to their enjoyment of the arts. This is one of the reasons why we take Equalities so seriously.

As a public body we’re required by law to collect and monitor information about who our funding is benefitting. This helps us report on our progress in addressing inequalities in the arts and helps us target funding where it’s needed most.

The Equality Act 2010 talks about people with "protected characteristics" and we’re collecting information about arts projects that target and deliver activity specifically for those groups of people. At the current time we’re gathering information about groups using the list included in The Equality Act 2010. We’re therefore asking you to tell us if your activities are for people from a particular age group, disabled people, people of a specific race, religion or belief, whether the activity is for men only, women only or has a focus on sexual orientation, gender reassignment, or pregnancy and maternity.

Section 4: Project Location

In this section we’re asking you to tell us where your project activity will take place.

We’re frequently asked to report on which parts of Wales benefit from our funding, so the information you provide in this section is very important.

It helps us ensure that our funding reaches all parts of Wales, and helps us monitor how we’re enabling access to the arts throughout the country, (including areas of deprivation and need identified by the Welsh Government).

If you don’t have the information you need to complete this section, you can use the postcode lookup tool on our website. For each postcode you enter, it will tell you the council ward, the local authority, the Government region and whether or not it’s a Communities First area.

Please tell us the postcode and ward name of every venue or location where your project will take place, and whether it’s a Communities First area. Use the boxes provided to tell us up to ten main locations. You can list any additional locations in the "benefiting the public" section of your project proposal, or you can upload this information as an attachment, by selecting "Other" from the dropdown list in section six of the application form. You can read more about attachments by clicking here.

Local Authority Area Served

Please tell us what proportion of your activity takes place in each local authority area by ticking the relevant boxes and inserting a rounded-up percentage. There’s also a box for activity outside Wales.

Government Region Served

Again, please tell us what proportion of your activity takes place in each Government region by ticking the relevant boxes and inserting a rounded-up percentage. There’s also a box for activity outside Wales.

Section 5: Declaration

In this section of the application form we’re asking you to read some important information about our responsibilities around Data Protection and Freedom of Information.

It’s important that you understand how the information you submit will be used and stored by us. And you need to know what to do if you believe that any of your information is commercially sensitive or confidential.

We’re then asking you to confirm a number of statements. And by ticking the box you’re signing the application form electronically on behalf of your organisation.

Section 6: Attachments

It’s in this section that you can upload your supporting documents. Our online system calls these attachments.

We highlighted in section two: your proposal, the attachments that you must submit with your application form. Here’s a reminder for you:

  • Your project budget, which must be on our project budget template, which you can download from the application form
  • Your Marketing Plan
  • At least two meaningful letters of support endorsing your project
  • Your Provisional Tour schedule (for touring projects only)
  • Copies of your accounts for the last two years. If your organisation is less than two years old and doesn’t have accounts you should submit evidence of a bank account in your organisation’s name with at least two signatories

Remember that these are mandatory. They form an essential part of our assessment and we won’t be able to accept your application without them.

You don’t need to provide accounts if you’re a local authority or university. Please upload a one page document acknowledging this, using the "annual accounts" option from dropdown menu.

How to upload your documents

Use the dropdown menu at the bottom of the screen to upload your documents. Each of the mandatory documents is included in the menu. There is also an "Other" category. You can use all of these categories more than once, but please note that there is a maximum total file size of 60MB for attachments.

If you need help with document formats or want further information on other technical issues, please read our Applying Online Information Sheet, or have a look at our attachments trouble shooting guide.

Other supporting information

You may find that you need to submit additional information with your application, which you can upload using the "Other" category on the drop-down menu. These could include:

  • Testimonials
  • Examples of your creative work
  • CVs of Creative Professionals who will be working with you
  • Your audience development plan
  • Three quotations for any single capital item costing £500 or more
  • Your Project Plan
  • Confirmation of partnership funding, including support in-kind

Section 7

This section allows you to review the information you’ve filled in so far, and to make any changes. Our online system will also tell you if you’ve missed any questions.

If you’re happy with your application you can click Submit. This forwards your application to us for consideration.

A copy of your completed application will always be available on our online system for you to see, once you’ve clicked the button to submit it. You’ll find it saved under the "submitted applications" section on our online system, after you’ve logged in. You can also print a copy for your own files.

Once you’ve clicked Submit you’ll receive an automatic acknowledgement by email. If you don’t receive this please check it’s not in your junk mail folder. If you still haven’t received your acknowledgement email, please check your application form and try clicking Submit again.

If your application isn’t finished, click Save and Finish Later. You’ll then receive an email containing a copy of your draft form. Please keep this email for reference.


What happens to your application?

Checking your application

We will confirm that we’ve received your application by sending you an acknowledgement email. This will also ask you to fill in your Equal Opportunities Monitoring Form by clicking the link to a dedicated page on our website. Your application cannot be considered complete unless this form has been filled in and submitted.

We’ll check your application and allocate it to an officer. We can only assess applications that are complete. By this we mean providing all of the information we have asked for in sufficient detail to enable us to carry out a proper assessment.

If we’re not able to assess your application, well tell you the main reasons why.

Assessment and decision making

Assessing officers will carefully consider your application and the supporting information you have provided. We don’t ask for additional information once the assessment has started, so it’s important that you answer each question as best you can, and that your supporting information is appropriately detailed and accurate.

Your application will be considered comparatively with others at a decision making meeting chaired by a senior member of staff.

How we make a decision

We know that demand for our funding through Arts Grants for Organisations is high, and there are good applications that we have to turn down because there is not enough money available. We will use our strategic priorities, our knowledge about your organisation and your previous activities, and our professional judgement to make these difficult decisions. We will always try and support the applications which have best demonstrated they’ll be of high quality.

If your application is successful

You’ll receive a formal offer of grant by email confirming the level of grant and any additional conditions (for example written confirmation of partnership funding). We’ll also send you our standard conditions of grant, our accreditation and branding requirements and information about your payments.

Payment

Grants up to £5,000 are usually paid in a single payment when we’ve received your electronically signed grant acceptance form (or signed and posted if we’ve agreed to do this). Once we’ve received your acceptance of our grant offer and you’ve confirmed your project’s start and end dates, you can begin your project.

For grants over £5,000 we review your financial information (including a cashflow) and provide a payment schedule. This will say when we need to receive financial or activity reports during the life of your project and indicate where any additional conditions will need to be met before a payment can be made. Once we’ve received your acceptance of our grant offer and you’ve confirmed your project’s start and end dates, you can begin your project.

During and after your project

It’s important that we know how your project is progressing. We may ask you for an Interim Report that tells us about your project’s finances and activity up to a certain point. We may arrange for our officers or advisers to attend activities and events so we can be confident about the quality of the work you are delivering.

At the end of your project we’ll ask you for a Completion Report. You’ll need to tell us your actual income and expenditure figures, including details about all your partnership funding, activity details and key outcomes as well as an evaluation of your project’s impact, showing how it delivered on its objectives.

Both Interim Reports and Completion Reports can be completed online.

If your application is unsuccessful

If your application is unsuccessful we’ll send you a letter by email explaining the main reasons for our decision. You’ll be able to discuss this with a member of our staff if you wish.

Further Advice

Need Further Information?

You can find a wealth of useful information that at www.artscouncilofwales.org.uk including:

  • our Getting Started Guide to Arts Grants for Organisations, separate guidance notes for each strand of Arts Grants for Organisations and our Information Sheets
  • Information about our other funding programmes
  • our Funding Companion that contains contact details for local authority Arts Services, other potential funders and organisations that may be able to offer help and advice
  • our latest corporate, strategic and information publications
  • research data
  • projects that we’ve funded
  • links to other potential sources of funding
  • the Arts Directory
  • our Newsletter and our News feed

Contact Us

Telephone: 0845 8734 900 (9am to 5pm Monday to Friday)

SMS: 07797 800 504 (messages charged at your standard network rate)

Email: information@artscouncilofwales.org.uk

What to do if you’re unable to accept money from the National Lottery

If you’re unable to accept lottery funding for religious reasons, please upload a letter with your application explaining why this is the case. If your application is successful we will try and fund your project from money we receive from other sources.

Disclaimer

We have tried to make sure the information we give is correct. We do not assume and hereby disclaim any liability to anyone for loss or damage caused by mistakes or omissions in the information we provide, whether these mistakes or omissions are caused by negligence, accident or any other reason.

Registered Charity Number 1034245